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2011-02-18T20:30:07Z

A Solar System Family Portrait, from the Inside Out.

A Solar System Family Portrait, from the Inside Out.

#Solar System#MESSENGER
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2017-09-17T00:00:00Z

Where is the Edge of the Solar System?

Where does the solar system end? It all depends on the criteria you are using. Based on where the planets end, you could say it's Neptune and the Kuiper Belt. If you measure by edge of the sun's magnetic fields, the end is the heliosphere. If you judge by the stopping point of sun's gravitational influence, the solar system would end at the Oort Cloud.

#Heliosphere#Sun#Solar System#Voyager#Interstellar Medium#Pluto#Kuiper Belt
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2007-11-21T13:50:02Z

Solar System in Miniature

Solar System in Miniature

#S Rings#Cassini-Huygens
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2014-03-24T20:50:24Z

Solar System, in Perspective

This artist's concept puts solar system distances in perspective. The scale bar is in astronomical units, with each set distance beyond 1 AU representing 10 times the previous distance. One AU is the distance from the sun to the Earth, which is about 93 million miles or 150 million kilometers. Neptune, the most distant planet from the sun, is about 30 AU. Informally, the term &quot;solar system&quot; is often used to mean the space out to the last planet. Scientific consensus, however, says the solar system goes out to the Oort Cloud, the source of the comets that swing by our sun on long time scales. Beyond the outer edge of the Oort Cloud, the gravity of other stars begins to dominate that of the sun. The inner edge of the main part of the Oort Cloud could be as close as 1,000 AU from our sun. The outer edge is estimated to be around 100,000 AU. NASA's Voyager 1, humankind's most distant spacecraft, is around 125 AU. Scientists believe it entered interstellar space, or the space between stars, on Aug. 25, 2012. Much of interstellar space is actually inside our solar system. It will take about 300 years for Voyager 1 to reach the inner edge of the Oort Cloud and possibly about 30,000 years to fly beyond it. Alpha Centauri is currently the closest star to our solar system. But, in 40,000 years, Voyager 1 will be closer to the star AC +79 3888 than to our own sun. AC +79 3888 is actually traveling faster toward Voyager 1 than the spacecraft is traveling toward it. The Voyager spacecraft were built and continue to be operated by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, in Pasadena, Calif. Caltech manages JPL for NASA. The Voyager missions are a part of NASA's Heliophysics System Observatory, sponsored by the Heliophysics Division of the Science Mission Directorate at NASA Headquarters in Washington. For more information about Voyager, visit: <a href="http://www.nasa.gov/voyager" rel="nofollow">www.nasa.gov/voyager</a> and <a href="http://voyager.jpl.nasa.gov" rel="nofollow">voyager.jpl.nasa.gov</a> . Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech <b><a href="http://www.nasa.gov/audience/formedia/features/MP_Photo_Guidelines.html" rel="nofollow">NASA image use policy.</a></b> <b><a href="http://www.nasa.gov/centers/goddard/home/index.html" rel="nofollow">NASA Goddard Space Flight Center</a></b> enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. <b>Follow us on <a href="http://twitter.com/NASAGoddardPix" rel="nofollow">Twitter</a></b> <b>Like us on <a href="http://www.facebook.com/pages/Greenbelt-MD/NASA-Goddard/395013845897?ref=tsd" rel="nofollow">Facebook</a></b> <b>Find us on <a href="http://instagram.com/nasagoddard?vm=grid" rel="nofollow">Instagram</a></b>

#Solar System, in Perspective
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2011-06-16T16:00:08Z

K/Th in the Inner Solar System

K/Th in the Inner Solar System

#Mercury#MESSENGER
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2000-11-06T21:39:55Z

The New Solar System

This solar system montage of the nine planets and four large moons of Jupiter in our solar system are set against a false-color view of the Rosette Nebula.

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2019-03-12T00:00:00Z

Our Solar System

Stefanie Milam talks about Webb's focus on our solar system.

#JWST#James Webb Space Telescope#Webb Telescope#Webb#spacecraft#telescope#astrophysics#technology#engineering#engineers#science#scientist#space#star#galaxy#universe#exoplanet#planets#Goddard Space Flight Center#NASA
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2009-11-03T23:27:04Z

A Color View of the Solar System Innermost Planet

A Color View of the Solar System Innermost Planet

#Mercury#MESSENGER
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2013-04-18T18:42:42Z

Kepler-69 and the Solar System

This diagram compares the planets of the inner solar system to Kepler-69, a two-planet system about 2,700 light-years from Earth in the constellation Cygnus.

#Kepler
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2005-11-29T21:56:14Z

Itsy Bitsy Solar System Artist Concept

Artist concept compares a hypothetical solar system centered around a tiny un to a known solar system centered around a star 55 Cancri.

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2011-04-28T20:01:43Z

Our Solar System, from the Outside

This graphic, based on data from NASA Voyager spacecraft, shows a model of what our solar system looks like to an observer outside in interstellar space, watching our solar system fly towards the observer.

#Voyager
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2014-04-17T17:58:46Z

Kepler-186 and the Solar System

This diagram compares the planets of our inner solar system to Kepler-186, a five-planet star system about 500 light-years from Earth in the constellation Cygnus.

#Kepler
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2013-04-18T18:42:41Z

Kepler-62 and the Solar System

This diagram compares the planets of the inner solar system to Kepler-62, a five-planet system about 1,200 light-years from Earth in the constellation Lyra. At seven billion years old, the star is somewhat older than the sun.

#Kepler
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2008-07-21T20:38:05Z

Solar System Montage with Eight Planets Artist Concept

This is an artist conception of a solar-system montage of the eight planets, a comet and an asteroid.

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2008-10-27T16:54:03Z

Young Solar System in the Making Artist Concept

This artist diagram based on observations from NASA Spitzer Space Telescope compares the Epsilon Eridani system to our own solar system. The two systems are structure

#Epsilon Eridani#Spitzer Space Telescope
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2017-12-14T00:00:00Z

Kepler-90 System Compared to Our Solar System (Artist's Concept)

Our solar system now is tied for most number of planets around a single star, with the recent discovery of an eighth planet circling Kepler-90, a Sun-like star 2,545 light years from Earth. The planet was discovered in data from NASA's Kepler Space Telescope. This artist's concept depicts the Kepler-90 system compared with our own solar system. The newly-discovered Kepler-90i -- a sizzling hot, rocky planet that orbits its star once every 14.4 days -- was found using machine learning from Google. Machine learning is an approach to artificial intelligence in which computers "learn." In this case, computers learned to identify planets by finding in Kepler data instances where the telescope recorded changes in starlight caused by planets beyond our solar system, known as exoplanets. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA22193

#Kepler#exoplanet#artist's concept#Kepler-90 system
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2012-09-18T20:05:08Z

Ice from the Solar System Edge Artist Concept

Researchers are brewing up icy, organic concoctions in the lab to mimic materials at the edge of our solar system and beyond. The lab is shown at right, and a very young solar system, with its swirling planet-forming disk is at left.

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2020-02-12T00:00:00Z

Voyager 1 Perspective for Family Portrait

This simulated view, made using NASA's Eyes on the Solar System app, approximates Voyager 1's perspective when it took its final series of images known as the "Family Portrait of the Solar System," including the "Pale Blue Dot" image. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA23681

#Voyager#Solar System
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2010-11-09T21:46:59Z

Mercury Caloris Basin, One of the Largest Impact Basins in the Solar System

Mercury Caloris Basin, One of the Largest Impact Basins in the Solar System

#Mercury#MESSENGER
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1999-10-08T15:54:25Z

Amirani-Maui: Longest Known Active Lava Flow in the Solar System

Amirani-Maui: Longest Known Active Lava Flow in the Solar System

#Io#Galileo
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2019-07-08T00:00:00Z

NASA ScienceCasts: Watch the History of our Solar System Fly By with MU69

Scientists are unlocking clues about the earliest formation of our solar system from a Kuiper Belt Object known as 2014 MU69.

#ScienceCasts#solar system#mu69#new horizons#kuiper belt#hubble space telescope#planetary science
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2011-12-16T19:18:02Z

Low-Energy Particles Leaking out of the Solar System Artist Concept

This artist concept shows NASA Voyager 1 spacecraft in a new region at the edge of our solar system where there are fewer low energy particles that originate from inside our solar system.

#Sun#Voyager
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2011-12-16T19:18:03Z

Energetic Particles from Outside our Solar System Increase Artist Concept

This artist concept shows NASA Voyager 1 spacecraft in a new region at the edge of our solar system where the amount of high-energy particles diffusing into our solar system from outside has increased.

#Sun#Voyager
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2019-05-22T00:00:00Z

NASA Science Live: Storms Across the Solar System [Episode 4]

This episode of NASA Science Live talks about storms across the solar system. Starting with how storms form on Earth. Then, what conditions cause them to happen on other planets in a weather forecast from across the solar system. Finally, a look at how NASA studies storms on our own planet and with the release of a weather balloon.-------To download in higher resolution go to: http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/13212

#NSL#NASA Science Live#storms#planets#Weather#Sophia Roberts#Scott Bednar#Chelsey Ballarte#Adam Thomas#Jim Green
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2004-12-09T17:57:00Z

A Distant Solar System Artist Concept

This artist concept depicts a distant hypothetical solar system, similar in age to our own. Looking inward from the system outer fringes, a ring of dusty debris can be seen, and within it, planets circling a star the size of our Sun. This debris is all that remains of the planet-forming disk from which the planets evolved. Planets are formed when dusty material in a large disk surrounding a young star clumps together. Leftover material is eventually blown out by solar wind or pushed out by gravitational interactions with planets. Billions of years later, only an outer disk of debris remains. These outer debris disks are too faint to be imaged by visible-light telescopes. They are washed out by the glare of the Sun. However, NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope can detect their heat, or excess thermal emission, in infrared light. This allows astronomers to study the aftermath of planet building in distant solar systems like our own. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA07096

#Spitzer Space Telescope#artist concept
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2007-11-06T16:53:26Z

Our Solar System Cousin? Artist Concept

This artist concept illustrates two planetary systems -- 55 Cancri top and our own. Blue lines show the orbits of planets, including the dwarf planet Pluto in our solar system.

#55 Cancri#PlanetQuest
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2012-05-16T20:28:02Z

The Hustle and Bustle of our Solar System

Results from NASA NEOWISE survey find that more potentially hazardous asteroids, or PHAs, are closely aligned with the plane of our solar system than previous models suggested.

#Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer WISE
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2007-11-29T17:55:23Z

Baby Picture of our Solar System

A rare, infrared view of a developing star and its flaring jets taken by NASA Spitzer Space Telescope shows us what our own solar system might have looked like billions of years ago.

#L1157#Spitzer Space Telescope
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2009-10-15T20:46:19Z

The Bubble of Our Solar System

As the solar wind flows from the sun, it creates a bubble in space known as the heliosphere around our solar system. The heliosphere is the region of space under the influence of our sun.

#Sun#Cassini-Huygens
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2008-11-19T16:21:01Z

Our Solar System Features Eight Planets

Our solar system features eight planets, seen in this artist’s diagram. This representation is intentionally fanciful, as the planets are depicted far closer together than they really are.

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2012-02-09T00:00:00Z

ScienceCast 47: Alien Matter in the Solar System - A Galactic Mismatch

"Alien matter" detected by a NASA spacecraft orbiting Earth shows that the chemical make-up of our solar system differs from that of the surrounding galaxy.

#NASA#Science#ScienceCasts#SMD#Science Mission Directorate#heliophysics#astrophysics#Milky Way#heliosphere#solar system#Voyager 1#Voyager 2
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2018-12-10T00:00:00Z

Voyager 2 and the Scale of the Solar System (Artist Concept)

This artist's concept puts solar system distances -- and the travels of NASA's Voyager 2 spacecraft -- in perspective. The scale bar is in astronomical units, with each set distance beyond 1 AU representing 10 times the previous distance. One AU is the distance from the Sun to Earth, which is about 93 million miles, or 150 million kilometers. Neptune, the most distant planet from the Sun, is about 30 AU. Much of the solar system is actually in interstellar space. Informally, the term "solar system" is often used to mean the space out to the last planet. Scientific consensus, however, says the solar system goes out to the Oort Cloud, the source of the comets that swing by our sun on long time scales. Beyond the outer edge of the Oort Cloud, the gravity of other stars begins to dominate that of the Sun. The inner edge of the main part of the Oort Cloud could be as close as 1,000 AU from our Sun. The outer edge is estimated to be around 100,000 AU. Voyager 2, the second farthest human-made object after Voyager 1, is around 119 AU from the Sun. Indications from the scientific instruments suggest Voyager 2 passed beyond our heliosphere (the bubble of plasma the Sun blows around itself) and into interstellar space (the space between stars) in November 2018. The heliosphere has a turbulent outer boundary known as the heliosheath. The termination shock is the inner boundary of the heliosheath and the heliopause is the outer boundary, beyond which lies interstellar space. Voyager 2 crossed the termination shock at 84 AU in August 2007. It will take about 300 years for Voyager 2 to reach the inner edge of the Oort Cloud and possibly about 30,000 years to fly beyond it. Voyager 2 is heading away from the Sun about 36 degrees out of the ecliptic plane (plane of the planets) to the south, toward the constellations of Sagittarius and Pavo. In about 40,000 years, Voyager 2 will be closer to another star than our own Sun, coming within about 1.7 light years of a star called Ross 248, a small star in the constellation of Andromeda. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA22921

#Voyager Interstellar Mission#artist concept
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2007-08-29T16:54:16Z

Water Early Journey in a Solar System Artist Concept

NASA Spitzer Space Telescope observed a fledgling solar system like the one depicted in this artist concept, and discovered deep within it enough water vapor to fill the oceans on Earth five times.

#NGC 1333#Spitzer Space Telescope
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2021-01-22T00:00:00Z

TRAPPIST-1 and Solar System Planet Stats

Detailed measurements of the physical properties of the seven rocky TRAPPIST-1 planets and the four terrestrial planets in our solar system help scientists find similarities and differences between the two planet families. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA24373

#TRAPPIST-1
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1996-09-12T17:34:52Z

Solar System Portrait - Earth as Pale Blue Dot

This narrow-angle color image of the Earth, dubbed Pale Blue Dot, is a part of the first ever 'portrait' of the solar system taken by NASA’s Voyager 1. The spacecraft acquired a total of 60 frames for a mosaic of the solar system from a distance of more than 4 billion miles from Earth and about 32 degrees above the ecliptic. From Voyager's great distance Earth is a mere point of light, less than the size of a picture element even in the narrow-angle camera. Earth was a crescent only 0.12 pixel in size. Coincidentally, Earth lies right in the center of one of the scattered light rays resulting from taking the image so close to the sun. This blown-up image of the Earth was taken through three color filters -- violet, blue and green -- and recombined to produce the color image. The background features in the image are artifacts resulting from the magnification. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00452

#Earth#Voyager#pale blue dot
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2013-07-10T00:00:00Z

IBEX Maps Solar System's Tail

NASA’s Interstellar Boundary Explorer, or IBEX, recently mapped the boundaries of the solar system’s tail, called the heliotail. By combining observations from the first three years of IBEX imagery, scientists have mapped out a tail that shows a combination of fast and slow moving particles. The entire structure twisted, because it experiences the pushing and pulling of magnetic fields outside the solar system.

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2017-02-22T17:50:08Z

TRAPPIST-1 Comparison to Solar System and Jovian Moons

All seven planets discovered in orbit around the red dwarf star TRAPPIST-1 could easily fit inside the orbit of Mercury, the innermost planet of our solar system. In fact, they would have room to spare. TRAPPIST-1 also is only a fraction of the size of our sun; it isn't much larger than Jupiter. So the TRAPPIST-1 system's proportions look more like Jupiter and its moons than those of our solar system. The seven planets of TRAPPIST-1 are all Earth-sized and terrestrial, according to research published in 2017 in the journal Nature. TRAPPIST-1 is an ultra-cool dwarf star in the constellation Aquarius, and its planets orbit very close to it. The system has been revealed through observations from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope and the ground-based TRAPPIST (TRAnsiting Planets and PlanetesImals Small Telescope) telescope, as well as other ground-based observatories. The system was named for the TRAPPIST telescope. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21428

#Spitzer Space Telescope#Trappist-1
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2018-06-28T00:00:00Z

'Oumuamua Races Toward Outskirts of Solar System (Artist's Concept)

This artist's illustration shows 'Oumuamua racing toward the outskirts of our solar system. Figure 1 is annotated with the locations of the planetary orbits. As the complex rotation of the object makes it difficult to determine the exact shape, there are many models of what it could look like. An artist's animation is available at https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA22357

#'Oumuamua
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2005-08-03T22:40:00Z

Newest Member of Our Solar System Artist Concept

This artist concept shows the planet catalogued as 2003UB313 at the lonely outer fringes of our solar system. Our Sun can be seen in the distance. The new planet is at least as big as Pluto and about three times farther away from the Sun than Pluto.

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2018-10-23T00:00:00Z

NASA ScienceCasts: Lightning Across the Solar System

Lightning is beautiful and powerful, and has been observed on planets across the solar system.

#ScienceCasts#Lightning#Mars#Venus#Jupiter#Saturn#Whistlers#sferics#Planetary Science#SMD
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1998-02-17T00:00:00Z

JPL-19980217-VOYAGEf-0001-AVC2002150 Voyager 1 Sets Distance Record

Voyager 1 reaches the edge of the solar system at 70 times the distance of Earth from the Sun.

#Voyager 1#edge of solar system
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1996-09-13T14:20:44Z

Solar System Portrait - 60 Frame Mosaic

The cameras of Voyager 1 on Feb. 14, 1990, pointed back toward the sun and took a series of pictures of the sun and the planets, making the first ever portrait of our solar system as seen from the outside. In the course of taking this mosaic consisting of a total of 60 frames, Voyager 1 made several images of the inner solar system from a distance of approximately 4 billion miles and about 32 degrees above the ecliptic plane. Thirty-nine wide angle frames link together six of the planets of our solar system in this mosaic. Outermost Neptune is 30 times further from the sun than Earth. Our sun is seen as the bright object in the center of the circle of frames. The wide-angle image of the sun was taken with the camera's darkest filter (a methane absorption band) and the shortest possible exposure (5 thousandths of a second) to avoid saturating the camera's vidicon tube with scattered sunlight. The sun is not large as seen from Voyager, only about one-fortieth of the diameter as seen from Earth, but is still almost 8 million times brighter than the brightest star in Earth's sky, Sirius. The result of this great brightness is an image with multiple reflections from the optics in the camera. Wide-angle images surrounding the sun also show many artifacts attributable to scattered light in the optics. These were taken through the clear filter with one second exposures. The insets show the planets magnified many times. Narrow-angle images of Earth, Venus, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune were acquired as the spacecraft built the wide-angle mosaic. Jupiter is larger than a narrow-angle pixel and is clearly resolved, as is Saturn with its rings. Uranus and Neptune appear larger than they really are because of image smear due to spacecraft motion during the long (15 second) exposures. From Voyager's great distance Earth and Venus are mere points of light, less than the size of a picture element even in the narrow-angle camera. Earth was a crescent only 0.12 pixel in size. Coincidentally, Earth lies right in the center of one of the scattered light rays resulting from taking the image so close to the sun. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00451

#Sun#Voyager
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1966-09-21T00:00:00Z

Solar Collector Mirror for Brayton Power System

NASA’s Lewis Research Center conducted extensive research programs in the 1960s and 1970s to develop systems that provide electrical power in space. One system, the Brayton cycle engine, converted solar thermal energy into electrical power. This system operated on a closed-loop Brayton thermodynamic cycle. The Brayton system relied on this large mirror to collect radiation from the sun. The mirror concentrated the Sun's rays on a heat storage receiver which warmed the Brayton system’s working fluid, a helium-xenon gas mixture. The heated fluid powered the system’s generator which produced power. In the mid-1960s Lewis researchers constructed this 30-foot diameter prototype of a parabolic solar mirror for the Brayton cycle system. The mirror had to be rigid, impervious to micrometeorite strikes, and lightweight. This mirror was comprised of twelve 1-inch thick magnesium plate sections that were coated with aluminum. The mirror could be compactly broken into its sections for launch.

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2018-02-05T00:00:00Z

Comparing TRAPPIST-1 to the Solar System

This graph presents known properties of the seven TRAPPIST-1 exoplanets (labeled b through h), showing how they stack up to the inner rocky worlds in our own solar system. The horizontal axis shows the level of illumination that each planet receives from its host star. TRAPPIST-1 is a mere 9 percent the mass of our Sun, and its temperature is much cooler. But because the TRAPPIST-1 planets orbit so closely to their star, they receive comparable levels of light and heat to Earth and its neighboring planets. The vertical axis shows the densities of the planets. Density, calculated based on a planet's mass and volume, is the first important step in understanding a planet's composition. The plot shows that the TRAPPIST-1 planet densities range from being similar to Earth and Venus at the upper end, down to values comparable to Mars at the lower end. The relative sizes of the planets are indicated by the circles. The masses and densities of the TRAPPIST-1 planets were determined by careful measurements of slight variations in the timings of their orbits using extensive observations made by NASA's Spitzer and Kepler space telescopes, in combination with data from Hubble and a number of ground-based telescopes. These measurements are the most precise to date for any system of exoplanets. By comparing these measurements with theoretical models of how planets form and evolve, researchers have determined that they are all rocky in overall composition. Estimates suggest the lower-density planets could have large quantities of water -- as much as 5 percent by mass for TRAPPIST-1d. Earth, in comparison, has only about 0.02 percent of its mass in the form of water. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA22095

#Spitzer Space Telescope#TRAPPIST-1#exoplanet
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2016-01-15T00:00:00Z

THE HIGH INTENSITY SOLAR ENVIRONMENT TEST SYSTEM

TODD SCHNEIDER LOOKS UP FROM WORK AT THE DOOR OF T HE HIGH INTENSITY SOLAR ENVIRONMENT TEST SYSTEM IN BUILDING 4605. SCHNEIDER IS A PHYSICIST IN THE MATERIALS AND PROCESSES DEPARTMENT AT MSFC AND IS PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR FOR HISET.

#TODD SCHNEIDER; HIGH INTENSITY SOLAR ENVIRONMENT; 4605
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2021-01-22T00:00:00Z

Comparison of TRAPPIST-1 to the Solar System

This graph presents measured properties of the seven TRAPPIST-1 exoplanets (labeled b through h), showing how they stack up with one another as well as with Earth and the other inner rocky worlds in our own solar system. The relative sizes of the planets are indicated by the circles. All of the known TRAPPIST-1 planets are larger than Mars, with five of them within 15% of the diameter of Earth. The vertical axis shows the uncompressed densities of the planets. Density, calculated from a planet's mass and volume, is the first important step in understanding its composition. Uncompressed density takes into account that the larger a planet is, the more its own gravity will pack the planet's material together and increase its density. Uncompressed density, therefore, usually provides a better means of comparing the composition of planets. The plot shows that the uncompressed densities of the TRAPPIST-1 planets are similar to one another, suggesting they may have all have a similar composition. The four rocky planets in our own solar system show more variation in density compared to the seven TRAPPIST-1 planets. Mercury, for example, contains a much higher percentage of iron than the other three rocky planets and thus has a much higher uncompressed density. The horizontal axis shows the level of illumination that each planet receives from its host star. The TRAPPIST-1 star is a mere 9% the mass of our Sun, and its temperature is much cooler. But because the TRAPPIST-1 planets orbit so closely to their star, they receive comparable levels of light and heat to Earth and its neighboring planets. The corresponding "habitable zones" — regions where an Earth-like planet could potentially support liquid water on its surface — of the two planetary systems are indicated near the top of the plot. The the two zones do not line up exactly because the cooler TRAPPIST-1 star emitting more of its light in the form of infrared radiation that is more efficiently absorbed by an Earth-like atmosphere. Since it takes less illumination to reach the same temperatures, the habitable zone shifts farther away from the star. The masses and densities of the TRAPPIST-1 planets were determined by measurements of slight variations in the timings of their orbits using extensive observations made by NASA's Spitzer and Kepler space telescopes, in combination with data from Hubble and a number of ground-based telescopes. The latest analysis, which includes Spitzer's complete record of over 1,000 hours of TRAPPIST-1 observations, has reduced the uncertainties of the mass measurements to a mere 3-6%. These are among the most accurate measurements of planetary masses anywhere outside of our solar system. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA24371

#TRAPPIST-1
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2018-07-12T00:00:00Z

Radar Images of Binary Asteroid 2017 YE5

Radar images of the binary asteroid 2017 YE5 from NASA's Goldstone Solar System Radar (GSSR). The observations, conducted on June 23, 2018, show two lobes, but do not yet show two separate objects. A movie is available at https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA22557

#Goldstone Solar System Radar#GSSR#asteroid#Asteroid 2017 YE5
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2018-12-03T00:00:00Z

Spacecraft Arrives at Asteroid to Investigate Origin of our Solar System

NASA’s Origins, Spectral Interpretation, Resource Identification, Security-Regolith Explorer (OSIRIS-REx) spacecraft rendezvoused with asteroid, Bennu, on Monday, Dec. 3. OSIRIS-REx launched in September 2016 and has been slowly approaching Bennu. The spacecraft will spend almost a year surveying the asteroid with five scientific instruments with the goal of selecting a location that is safe and scientifically interesting to collect the sample of the asteroid. OSIRIS-REx will return the sample to Earth in September 2023.

#OSIRIS-REx#Asteroid#Spectral Interpretation, Resource Identification, Security-Regolith Explorer#Bennu
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2005-09-14T00:00:00Z

The Atmospheric Turbulence Measurement System booms extend forward from the Pathfinder-Plus solar wing as it soars over Rogers Dry Lake.

The Atmospheric Turbulence Measurement System booms extend forward from the Pathfinder-Plus solar wing as it soars over Rogers Dry Lake on its final flight.

#Pathfinder-Plus#solar-electric flying wing#Rogers Dry Lake#NASA Dryden Flight Research Center#turbulence-measurement flight#Atmospheric Turbulence Measurement System
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2016-01-20T00:00:00Z

A New Planet in our Solar System? NASA Takes a Look

NASA’s Director of Planetary Science, Jim Green, discusses the Jan. 20, 2016 Astronomical Journal science paper that points to the possibility of a new “Planet 9” in our solar system beyond Pluto, examining the scientific process and inviting you to have a front row seat to our exploration of the solar system.

#Planet X#Planet 9
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1989-05-11T00:00:00Z

SOLAR CONCENTRATOR ADVANCED DEVELOPMENT

Testing of the Solar Dynamic Collector for Space Freedom. The solar dynamic power system includes a solar concentrator, which collects sunlight; a receiver, which accepts and stores the concentrated solar energy and transfers this energy to a gas; a Brayton turbine, alternator, and compressor unit, which generates electric power; and a radiator, which rejects waste heat.

#System#1989_05565.jpg#c1989_05500s#Power#333#Facility#Systems#Development#Solar#Advanced#Power Systems Facility#PSF#Power System Facility#Concentrator#SOLAR CONCENTRATOR ADVANCED DEVELOPMENT#Avail_ready
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2014-09-23T00:00:00Z

Bennu's Journey Teaser

The solar system today is an orderly place, much quieter than it was in its turbulent youth. How did our Sun, the Earth and the planets evolve from a whirlpool of gas, dust, and fiery droplets of molten rock? To answer this question, scientists are planning to visit asteroid Bennu (1999 RQ-36), which is composed of the same raw ingredients that created the planets. Bennu is a survivor of our solar system's early chaos, and following its journey will teach us a great deal about our own origins. This video is the official teaser for Bennu's Journey, a signature animation of NASA's OSIRIS-REx mission.

#Asteroid#Solar System#Planetary Science#OSIRIS-REx#Planets and Moons
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1996-09-13T14:46:22Z

Solar System Portrait - Views of 6 Planets

These six narrow-angle color images were made from the first ever portrait of the solar system taken by NASA’s Voyager 1, which was more than 4 billion miles from Earth and about 32 degrees above the ecliptic. The spacecraft acquired a total of 60 frames for a mosaic of the solar system which shows six of the planets. Mercury is too close to the sun to be seen. Mars was not detectable by the Voyager cameras due to scattered sunlight in the optics, and Pluto was not included in the mosaic because of its small size and distance from the sun. These blown-up images, left to right and top to bottom are Venus, Earth, Jupiter, and Saturn, Uranus, Neptune. The background features in the images are artifacts resulting from the magnification. The images were taken through three color filters -- violet, blue and green -- and recombined to produce the color images. Jupiter and Saturn were resolved by the camera but Uranus and Neptune appear larger than they really are because of image smear due to spacecraft motion during the long (15 second) exposure times. Earth appears to be in a band of light because it coincidentally lies right in the center of the scattered light rays resulting from taking the image so close to the sun. Earth was a crescent only 0.12 pixels in size. Venus was 0.11 pixel in diameter. The planetary images were taken with the narrow-angle camera (1500 mm focal length). http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00453

#Earth#Voyager
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2018-02-05T00:00:00Z

TRAPPIST-1 Compared to Jovian Moons and Inner Solar System - Updated Feb. 2018

All seven planets discovered in orbit around the red dwarf star TRAPPIST-1 could easily fit inside the orbit of Mercury, the innermost planet of our solar system. In fact, they would have room to spare. TRAPPIST-1 also is only a fraction of the size of our Sun; it isn't much larger than Jupiter. So, the TRAPPIST-1 system's proportions look more like Jupiter and its moons than those of our solar system. The seven planets of TRAPPIST-1 are all Earth-sized and terrestrial. TRAPPIST-1 is an ultra-cool dwarf star in the constellation Aquarius, and its planets orbit very close to it. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA22096

#Spitzer Space Telescope#TRAPPIST-1#exoplanet
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2016-03-23T00:00:00Z

TODD SCHNEIDER INSIDE THE HIGH INTENSITY SOLAR ENVIRONMENT TEST

TODD SCHNEIDER ADJUSTS THE LIGHT HITTING A SAMPLE INSIDE THE HIGH INTENSITY SOLAR ENVIRONMENT TEST SYSTEM CHAMBER.

#TODD SCHNEIDER; HIGH INTENSITY SOLAR ENVIRONMENT TEST SYSTEM CHA
Rover Photos ID: undefined
2020-02-12T00:00:00Z

Pale Blue Dot Revisited

For the 30th anniversary of one of the most iconic images taken by NASA's Voyager mission, a new version of the image known as "the Pale Blue Dot." Planet Earth is visible as a bright speck within the sunbeam just right of center and appears softly blue, as in the original version published in 1990 (see PIA00452). This updated version uses modern image-processing software and techniques to revisit the well-known Voyager view while attempting to respect the original data and intent of those who planned the images. In 1990, the Voyager project planned to shut off the Voyager 1 spacecraft's imaging cameras to conserve power and because the probe, along with its sibling Voyager 2, would not fly close enough to any other objects to take pictures. Before the shutdown, the mission commanded the probe to take a series of 60 images designed to produce what they termed the "Family Portrait of the Solar System." Executed on Valentine's Day 1990, this sequence returned images for making color views of six of the solar system's planets and also imaged the Sun in monochrome. The popular name of this view is traced to the title of the 1994 book by Voyager imaging scientist Carl Sagan, who originated the idea of using Voyager's cameras to image the distant Earth and played a critical role in enabling the family portrait images to be taken. The image of Earth was originally published by NASA in 1990. It is republished here to commemorate the 30th anniversary of the Family Portrait of the Solar System (see PIA00451) and the Pale Blue Dot image in particular. The planet occupies less than a single pixel in the image and thus is not fully resolved. (The actual width of the planet on the sky was less than one pixel in Voyager's camera.) By contrast, Jupiter and Saturn were large enough to fill a full pixel in their family portrait images. The direction of the Sun is toward the bottom of the view (where the image is brightest). Rays of sunlight scattered within the camera optics stretch across the scene. One of those light rays happens to have intersected dramatically with Earth. From Voyager 1's vantage point — a distance of approximately 3.8 billion miles (6 billion kilometers) — Earth was separated from the Sun by only a few degrees. The close proximity of the inner planets to the Sun was a key factor preventing these images from being taken earlier in the mission, as our star was still close and bright enough to damage the cameras with its blinding glare. The view is a color composite created by combining images taken using green, blue and violet spectral filters by the Voyager 1 Narrow-Angle Camera. They were taken at 4:48 GMT on Feb. 14, 1990, just 34 minutes before Voyager 1 powered off its cameras forever. Like the original version, this is technically a "false-color" view, as the color-filter images used were mapped to red, green and blue, respectively. The brightness of each color channel was balanced relative to the others, which is likely why the scene appears brighter but less grainy than the original. In addition, the color was balanced so that the main sunbeam (which overlays Earth) appears white, like the white light of the Sun. At its original resolution, the newly processed color image is 666 by 659 pixels in size; this is Figure A. The main image is an enlarged version. The image was processed by JPL engineer and image processing enthusiast Kevin M. Gill with input from two of the image's original planners, Candy Hansen and William Kosmann. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA23645

#Voyager#Solar System
Rover Photos ID: undefined
2003-03-04T00:00:00Z

EC03-0058-2

Aerovironment technicians carefully line up attachments as a fuel cell electrical system is installed on the Helios Prototype solar powered flying wing. The fuel cell system will power the aircraft at night during NASA-sponsored long-endurance demonstration flight in the summer of 2003.

#Helios Prototype solar powered flying wing#AeroVironment#fuel cell system
Rover Photos ID: undefined
1996-09-13T10:01:39Z

Solar System Portrait - View of the Sun, Earth and Venus

This color image of the sun, Earth and Venus was taken by the Voyager 1 spacecraft Feb. 14, 1990, when it was approximately 32 degrees above the plane of the ecliptic and at a slant-range distance of approximately 4 billion miles. It is the first -- and may be the only -- time that we will ever see our solar system from such a vantage point. The image is a portion of a wide-angle image containing the sun and the region of space where the Earth and Venus were at the time with two narrow-angle pictures centered on each planet. The wide-angle was taken with the camera's darkest filter (a methane absorption band), and the shortest possible exposure (5 thousandths of a second) to avoid saturating the camera's vidicon tube with scattered sunlight. The sun is not large in the sky as seen from Voyager's perspective at the edge of the solar system but is still eight million times brighter than the brightest star in Earth's sky, Sirius. The image of the sun you see is far larger than the actual dimension of the solar disk. The result of the brightness is a bright burned out image with multiple reflections from the optics in the camera. The "rays" around the sun are a diffraction pattern of the calibration lamp which is mounted in front of the wide angle lens. The two narrow-angle frames containing the images of the Earth and Venus have been digitally mosaiced into the wide-angle image at the appropriate scale. These images were taken through three color filters and recombined to produce a color image. The violet, green and blue filters were used; exposure times were, for the Earth image, 0.72, 0.48 and 0.72 seconds, and for the Venus frame, 0.36, 0.24 and 0.36, respectively. Although the planetary pictures were taken with the narrow-angle camera (1500 mm focal length) and were not pointed directly at the sun, they show the effects of the glare from the nearby sun, in the form of long linear streaks resulting from the scattering of sunlight off parts of the camera and its sun shade. From Voyager's great distance both Earth and Venus are mere points of light, less than the size of a picture element even in the narrow-angle camera. Earth was a crescent only 0.12 pixel in size. Coincidentally, Earth lies right in the center of one of the scattered light rays resulting from taking the image so close to the sun. Detailed analysis also suggests that Voyager detected the moon as well, but it is too faint to be seen without special processing. Venus was only 0.11 pixel in diameter. The faint colored structure in both planetary frames results from sunlight scattered in the optics. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00450

#Sun#Voyager#Earth#Venus
Rover Photos ID: undefined
2003-03-04T00:00:00Z

EC03-0058-6

Technicians for AeroVironment, Inc., jack up a pressure tank to the wing of the Helios Prototype solar-electric flying wing. The tank carries pressurized hydrogen to fuel an experimental fuel cell system that powered the aircraft at night during an almost two-day long-endurance flight demonstration in the summer of 2003.

#Helios Prototype solar powered flying wing#AeroVironment#fuel cell system
Rover Photos ID: undefined
2011-12-19T00:00:00Z

Kepler Confirms First Earth-Sized Planet Outside Our Solar System (Kepler-20) (Reporter Package)

NASA's Kepler mission has confirmed the discovery of the first Earth-size planets outside our solar system orbiting a sun-like star. Located about 1,000 light years from Earth, the Kepler-20 solar system has five planets orbiting a star similar to the Sun. Kepler-20f, the 4th planet in the system, is about 90 percent the size of Earth. Kepler-20f is slightly larger than Earth,with a radius that is 3 percent larger.

#NASA Ames Research Center#Kepler#Kepler Mission#Kepler-20#Reporter Package
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2016-04-20T00:00:00Z

Animation of Heliopause Electrostatic Rapid Transport System (HERTS)

Animation of Heliopause Electrostatic Rapid Transport System (HERTS) concept. NASA engineers are conducting tests to develop models for the Heliopause Electrostatic Rapid Transport System. HERTS builds upon the electric sail invention of Dr. Pekka Janhunen of the Finnish Meteorological Institute. An electric sail could potentially send scientific payloads to the edge of our solar system, the heliopause, in less than 10 years. The research is led by Bruce M. Wiegmann, an engineer in the Advanced Concepts Office at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. The HERTS E-Sail development and testing is funded by NASA’s Space Technology Mission Directorate through the NASA Innovative Advanced Concepts Program.

#Heliopause Electrostatic Rapid Transport System#HERTS#Animation#MSFC#Solar Sail
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2019-02-15T00:00:00Z

NASA ScienceCasts: Big Questions About Small Worlds

Small Worlds hold keys to questions about our solar system and the origin of life on Earth.

#NASA#ScienceCasts#solar system#planetary science#asteroids#comets#near-Earth objects#kuiper belt
Rover Photos ID: undefined
1992-01-05T00:00:00Z

ARC-1992-AC92-0057-7

SSE (Solar System Exploration) flight apparatus: PDE (Particle Dispersion Experiement) on-board USML-1 (GEM)

#SSE (Solar System Exploration)#PDE (Particle Dispersion Experiement)#USML-1 (GEM)
Rover Photos ID: undefined
1992-01-05T00:00:00Z

ARC-1992-AC92-0057-6

SSE (Solar System Exploration) flight apparatus: PDE (Particle Dispersion Experiement) on-board USML-1 (GEM)

#SSE (Solar System Exploration)#PDE (Particle Dispersion Experiement)#USML-1 (GEM)
Rover Photos ID: undefined
2018-04-03T00:00:00Z

NASA ScienceCasts: The Sweet Smell of Life Support

The International Space Station is a testbed for technologies that will allow astronauts to live comfortably during long journeys into the solar system.

#NASA#ScienceCasts#ISS#International Space Station#life support#Mars#recycling#space travel#solar system
Rover Photos ID: undefined
1992-01-05T00:00:00Z

ARC-1992-AC92-0057-2

SSE (Solar System Exploration) flight apparatus: PDE (Particle Dispersion Experiement) on-board USML-1 (GEM)

#SSE (Solar System Exploration)#PDE (Particle Dispersion Experiement)#USML-1 (GEM)
Rover Photos ID: undefined
2017-12-12T00:00:00Z

Artificial Intelligence and NASA Data Used to Discover Eighth Planet Circling Distant Star

Our solar system now is tied for most number of planets around a single star, with the recent discovery of an eighth planet circling Kepler-90, a Sun-like star 2,545 light years from Earth. The planet was discovered in data from NASA’s Kepler space telescope. The newly-discovered Kepler-90i -- a sizzling hot, rocky planet that orbits its star once every 14.4 days -- was found by researchers from Google and The University of Texas at Austin using machine learning. Machine learning is an approach to artificial intelligence in which computers “learn.” In this case, computers learned to identify planets by finding in Kepler data instances where the telescope recorded signals from planets beyond our solar system, known as exoplanets. Video Credit: NASA Ames Research Center / Google

#nasa ames research center#nasa in silicon valley#kepler mission#space telescope#exoplanet#star#sun#solar system#machine learning#artificial intelligence#a.i.#google
Rover Photos ID: undefined
2012-06-21T00:00:00Z

ScienceCast 66: Voyager 1 at the Final Frontier

At the edge of the solar system, Voyager 1 is reporting a sharp increase in cosmic rays that could herald the spacecraft's long-awaited entry into interstellar space.

#NASA#Science#ScienceCasts#SMD#Science Mission Directorate#heliophysics#Voyager#interstellar space#solar system#heliosphere
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2011-06-09T00:00:00Z

ScienceCast 14: Big Surprise

NASA's Voyager probes have reached the edge of the solar system and found something surprising there--a froth of magnetic bubbles separating us from the rest of the galaxy.

#NASA#Science#ScienceCasts#SMD#Science Mission Directorate#heliophysics#cosmic rays#Voyager#interstellar space#Solar System
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2010-02-11T17:28:40Z

Solar Dynamics Observatory Artist Concept

The Solar Dynamics Observatory SDO spacecraft, shown above the Earth as it faces toward the Sun. SDO is designed to study the influence of the Sun on the Earth and the inner solar system by studying the solar atmosphere. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA18169

#Solar Dynamics Observatory SDO#artist concept
Rover Photos ID: undefined
2007-08-29T16:54:15Z

Steamy Solar System

This diagram illustrates the earliest journeys of water in a young, forming star system. NASA Spitzer Space Telescope was able to probe a crucial phase of this stellar evolution.

#NGC 1333#Spitzer Space Telescope
Rover Photos ID: undefined
1997-01-15T12:33:16Z

Solar System Montage

This is a montage of planetary images taken by spacecraft managed by NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, CA. Included are from top to bottom images of Mercury, Venus, Earth and Moon, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune.

#montage#artist concept
Rover Photos ID: undefined
1999-05-03T15:14:06Z

Solar System Montage Updated

This is an updated montage of planetary images taken by spacecraft managed by NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, CA. Included are from top to bottom images of Mercury, Venus, Earth and Moon, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune.

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1999-12-10T01:00:29Z

Solar System Portrait - Earth

This image of the Earth is one of 60 frames taken by NASA Voyager 1 spacecraft on Feb. 14, 1990 from a distance of approximately 4 billion miles and about 32 degrees above the ecliptic plane.

#Earth#Voyager
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2013-10-25T23:04:11Z

Jewel of the Solar System

A swing high above Saturn by NASA Cassini spacecraft revealed this stately view of the golden-hued planet and its main rings. Saturn sports differently colored bands of weather in this image.

#Saturn#Cassini-Huygens
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2015-07-23T17:01:01Z

Planetary System Comparisons

This size and scale of the Kepler-452 system compared alongside the Kepler-186 system and the solar system. Kepler-186 is a miniature solar system that would fit entirely inside the orbit of Mercury. The habitable zone of Kepler-186 is very small compared to that of Kepler-452 or the sun because it is a much smaller, cooler star. The size and extent of the habitable zone of Kepler-452 is nearly the same as that of the sun, but is slightly bigger because Kepler-452 is somewhat older, bigger and brighter. The size of the orbit of Kepler-452b is nearly the same as that of Earth at 1.05 astronomical units (an astronomical unit is the distance between Earth and the sun). Kepler-452b orbits its star once every 385 days. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19826

#Kepler#Kepler-452#Kepler-186
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2011-04-26T00:00:00Z

KSC-2011-3095

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- NASA's Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory, or GRAIL, mission logo on the side of the United Launch Alliance Delta II rocket that will loft the spacecraft into lunar orbit. The GRAIL mission is a part of NASA's Discovery Program. GRAIL will fly twin spacecraft in tandem orbits around the moon for several months to measure its gravity field. The mission also will answer longstanding questions about Earth's moon and provide scientists a better understanding of how Earth and other rocky planets in the solar system formed. GRAIL is scheduled to launch September 8, 2011. For more information visit: http://science.nasa.gov/missions/grail/. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann

#Delta II, ELV, science, exploration, solar system, Goddard, JPL
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2004-09-17T00:00:00Z

AeroVironment ground crew check out the operation of the Pathfinder-Plus solar aircraft's electric motors during combined systems tests on Rogers Dry Lake.

AeroVironment ground crew check out the operation of the Pathfinder-Plus solar aircraft's electric motors during combined systems tests on Rogers Dry Lake.

#AeroVironment#Pathfinder-Plus#Pathfinder#Rogers Dry Lake#flying wing#lightweight solar aircraft
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2005-08-31T00:00:00Z

The Atmospheric Turbulence Measurement System booms are clearly evident in this view of the Pathfinder-Plus solar aircraft as it flies over Rogers Dry Lake.

The Atmospheric Turbulence Measurement System booms are clearly evident in this view of the Pathfinder-Plus solar aircraft as it flies over Rogers Dry Lake.

#Pathfinder-Plus#solar-electric flying wing#Rogers Dry Lake#NASA Dryden Flight Research Center#turbulence-measurement flight
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1990-04-25T00:00:00Z

STS-31 pre-deployment checkout of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) on OV-103

View taken through overhead window W7 aboard Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, shows the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) grappled by the remote manipulator system (RMS) and held in a 90 degree pitch position against the blackness of space. The solar array (SA) panel (center) and the high gain antennae (HGA) (on either side) are visible along the Support System Module (SSM) forward shell prior to deployment during STS-31.

#ANTENNAS#DISCOVERY (ORBITER)#END EFFECTORS#HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE#STS-31 PAYLOAD DEPLOYMENT & RETRIEVAL SYSTEM#REMOTE MANIPULATOR SYSTEM#SUN SOLAR ARRAYS
Rover Photos ID: undefined
1990-04-25T00:00:00Z

STS-31 pre-deployment checkout of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) on OV-103

The Hubble Space Telescope (HST), grappled by Discovery's, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103's, remote manipulator system (RMS), is oriented in a 90 degree pitch position during STS-31 pre-deployment checkout procedures. The solar array (SA) panel (center) and high gain antennae (HGA) (on either side) are stowed along the Support System Module (SSM) forward shell prior to deployment. The sun highlights HST against the blackness of space.

#ANTENNAS#DISCOVERY (ORBITER)#HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE#SOLAR ARRAYS#STS-31#PAYLOAD DEPLOYMENT & RETRIEVAL SYSTEM#REMOTE MANIPULATOR SYSTEM
Rover Photos ID: undefined
1990-04-25T00:00:00Z

Hubble Space Telescope (HST) grappled by OV-103's RMS during STS-31 checkout

The Hubble Space Telescope (HST), grappled by Discovery's, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103's, remote manipulator system (RMS), is held in a pre-deployment position. During STS-31 checkout procedures, the solar array (SA) panels and the high gain antennae (HGA) will be deployed. The starboard SA (center) and the two HGA are stowed along side the Support System Module (SSM) forward shell. The sun highlights HST against the blackness of space.

#ANTENNAS#DISCOVERY (ORBITER)#HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE#SOLAR ARRAYS#STS-31#PAYLOAD DEPLOYMENT & RETRIEVAL SYSTEM#REMOTE MANIPULATOR SYSTEM
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2014-04-09T17:00:06Z

Finding Faults in Melas Chasma

Melas Chasma is part of the Valles Marineris canyon system, the largest canyon in the Solar System. This image was taken by NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

#Mars#Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter MRO
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2010-04-29T22:10:06Z

Floor of Ius Chasma

Ius Chasma is one of several canyons that make up Valles Marineris, the largest canyon system in the Solar System as seen by NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

#Mars#Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter MRO
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2017-07-20T00:00:00Z

JPL-20170720-VOYAGEs-0001-Voyager Media Reel 3

The continuing mission of Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 to Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune and interstellar space is documented. Included: construction and launch of the spacecraft. Movies made by the spacecraft. Animation of the Voyagers at the outer planets. A description of the "solar system portrait." The sounds recorded by Voyager 1 passing through dense interstellar plasma.

#Voyager#Media Reel#animation#solar system#interstellar space#launch#Ed Stone#portrait
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1991-04-07T00:00:00Z

OV-104's RMS releases Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) during STS-37 deployment

Atlantis', Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104's, remote manipulator system (RMS) releases Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) during STS-37 deployment. Visible on the GRO as it drifts away from the RMS end effector are the four complement instruments: the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment (bottom); Imaging Compton Telescope (COMPTEL) (center); Oriented Scintillation Spectrometer Experiment (OSSE) (top); and Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) (at four corners). GRO's solar array (SA) panels are extended and are in orbit configuration. View was taken through aft flight deck window which reflects some of the crew compartment interior.

#ATLANTIS (ORBITER)#GAMMA RAY OBSERVATORY#REMOTE MANIPULATOR SYSTEM#STS-37 PAYLOAD DEPLOYMENT & RETRIEVAL SYSTEM#SOLAR ARRAYS
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2018-12-10T00:00:00Z

JPL-20181210-VOYAGEp-0001-Voyager 2 Enters Interstellar Space

Forty-one years after it launched into space, NASA’s Voyager 2 probe has exited our solar bubble and entered the region between stars. Its twin, Voyager 1, made this historic crossing in 2012. Edward Stone, the Voyager mission’s project scientist, and Suzanne Dodd, the mission project manager, discuss this major milestone and what’s to come for the trailblazing probe. For more about the Voyagers, including the Grand Tour of the Solar System and the Golden Record, visit https://voyager.jpl.nasa.gov

#NASA#JPL#Jet Propulsion Laboratory#Caltech#Voyager#Interstellar space#heliosphere#solar bubble#solar system#space#science#v'ger#vger#Ed Stone#Suzy Dodd
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2016-08-11T00:00:00Z

2016 Summer Series - Alan Stern - The Exploration of Pluto by New Horizons

Interplanetary exploration is essential for the long-term survival of our species. Robotic space exploration allows us to advance our knowledge of our solar system and beyond. Dr. Alan Stern will talk about the New Horizons mission to Pluto and the scientific knowledge gained through the exploration of the icy worlds at the edge of our solar system.

#nasa ames#nasa in silicon valley#2016 summer series#ames office of the chief scientist#ames ocs#alan stern#pluto#planet#kuiper belt#new horizons#solar system#flyby#fly by#planetary exploration
Rover Photos ID: undefined
1990-04-25T00:00:00Z

Hubble Space Telescope (HST) solar array (SA) panel deployment during STS-31

STS031-10-023 (25 April 1990) --- View of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) on the end of Discovery's Remote Manipulator System (RMS) arm prior to deployment of its antennae and solar array panels.

#ANTENNAS#DISCOVERY (ORBITER)#EARTH LIMB#EARTH SURFACE#SOLAR ARRAYS#HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE#PAYLOAD DEPLOYMENT & RETRIEVAL SYSTEM#STS-31 REMOTE MANIPULATOR SYSTEM
Rover Photos ID: undefined
1991-04-07T00:00:00Z

STS-37 Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) grappled by RMS

Backdropped against the Earth's surface, the Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) with its solar array (SA) panels deployed is grappled by the remote manipulator system (RMS) during STS-37 systems checkout. GRO's four complement instruments are visible: the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) (at the bottom); the Imaging Compton Telescope (COMPTEL) (center); the Oriented Scintillation Spectrometer Experiment (OSSE) (top); and Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) (on four corners). The view was taken by STS-37 crew through an aft flight deck overhead window.

#ATLANTIS (ORBITER)#EARTH SURFACE#GAMMA RAY OBSERVATORY#SOLAR ARRAYS#PAYLOAD DEPLOYMENT & RETRIEVAL SYSTEM#REMOTE MANIPULATOR SYSTEM#STS-37
Rover Photos ID: undefined
2011-04-25T00:00:00Z

KSC-2011-3073

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Trucks deliver the first set of solid-fueled boosters to Launch Complex 17-B at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida where a United Launch Alliance Delta II is being prepared for launch. The Delta II will carry NASA's Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory, or GRAIL, spacecraft into lunar orbit. The GRAIL mission is a part of NASA's Discovery Program. GRAIL will fly twin spacecraft in tandem orbits around the moon for several months to measure its gravity field. The mission also will answer longstanding questions about Earth's moon and provide scientists a better understanding of how Earth and other rocky planets in the solar system formed. GRAIL is scheduled to launch September 8, 2011. For more information visit: http://science.nasa.gov/missions/grail/. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann

#Delta II, ELV, science, exploration, solar system, Goddard, JPL
Rover Photos ID: undefined
2011-04-25T00:00:00Z

KSC-2011-3074

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Trucks deliver the first set of solid-fueled boosters to Launch Complex 17-B at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida where a United Launch Alliance Delta II is being prepared for launch. The Delta II will carry NASA's Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory, or GRAIL, spacecraft into lunar orbit. The GRAIL mission is a part of NASA's Discovery Program. GRAIL will fly twin spacecraft in tandem orbits around the moon for several months to measure its gravity field. The mission also will answer longstanding questions about Earth's moon and provide scientists a better understanding of how Earth and other rocky planets in the solar system formed. GRAIL is scheduled to launch September 8, 2011. For more information visit: http://science.nasa.gov/missions/grail/. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann

#Delta II, ELV, science, exploration, solar system, Goddard, JPL
Rover Photos ID: undefined
2011-04-25T00:00:00Z

KSC-2011-3083

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- A solid-fueled booster is lifted into Launch Complex 17-B at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida where a United Launch Alliance Delta II is being prepared for launch. The Delta II will carry NASA's Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory, or GRAIL, spacecraft into lunar orbit. The GRAIL mission is a part of NASA's Discovery Program. GRAIL will fly twin spacecraft in tandem orbits around the moon for several months to measure its gravity field. The mission also will answer longstanding questions about Earth's moon and provide scientists a better understanding of how Earth and other rocky planets in the solar system formed. GRAIL is scheduled to launch September 8, 2011. For more information visit: http://science.nasa.gov/missions/grail/. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann

#Delta II, ELV, science, exploration, solar system, Goddard, JPL
Rover Photos ID: undefined
2011-04-25T00:00:00Z

KSC-2011-3085

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Technicians prepare to lift the third solid-fueled booster into Launch Complex 17-B at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida where a United Launch Alliance Delta II is being prepared for launch. The Delta II will carry NASA's Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory, or GRAIL, spacecraft into lunar orbit. The GRAIL mission is a part of NASA's Discovery Program. GRAIL will fly twin spacecraft in tandem orbits around the moon for several months to measure its gravity field. The mission also will answer longstanding questions about Earth's moon and provide scientists a better understanding of how Earth and other rocky planets in the solar system formed. GRAIL is scheduled to launch September 8, 2011. For more information visit: http://science.nasa.gov/missions/grail/. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann

#Delta II, ELV, science, exploration, solar system, Goddard, JPL
Rover Photos ID: undefined
2011-04-25T00:00:00Z

KSC-2011-3087

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- The first stage of a United Launch Alliance Delta II rocket at Launch Complex 17-B at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida where it is being prepared for launch. The Delta II will carry NASA's Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory, or GRAIL, spacecraft into lunar orbit. The GRAIL mission is a part of NASA's Discovery Program. GRAIL will fly twin spacecraft in tandem orbits around the moon for several months to measure its gravity field. The mission also will answer longstanding questions about Earth's moon and provide scientists a better understanding of how Earth and other rocky planets in the solar system formed. GRAIL is scheduled to launch September 8, 2011. For more information visit: http://science.nasa.gov/missions/grail/. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann

#Delta II, ELV, science, exploration, solar system, Goddard, JPL
Rover Photos ID: undefined
2011-04-25T00:00:00Z

KSC-2011-3089

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- A solid-fueled booster is lifted into Launch Complex 17-B at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida where a United Launch Alliance Delta II is being prepared for launch. The Delta II will carry NASA's Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory, or GRAIL, spacecraft into lunar orbit. The GRAIL mission is a part of NASA's Discovery Program. GRAIL will fly twin spacecraft in tandem orbits around the moon for several months to measure its gravity field. The mission also will answer longstanding questions about Earth's moon and provide scientists a better understanding of how Earth and other rocky planets in the solar system formed. GRAIL is scheduled to launch September 8, 2011. For more information visit: http://science.nasa.gov/missions/grail/. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann

#Delta II, ELV, science, exploration, solar system, Goddard, JPL
Rover Photos ID: undefined
2011-04-25T00:00:00Z

KSC-2011-3090

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- A solid-fueled booster is lifted into Launch Complex 17-B at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida where a United Launch Alliance Delta II is being prepared for launch. The Delta II will carry NASA's Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory, or GRAIL, spacecraft into lunar orbit. The GRAIL mission is a part of NASA's Discovery Program. GRAIL will fly twin spacecraft in tandem orbits around the moon for several months to measure its gravity field. The mission also will answer longstanding questions about Earth's moon and provide scientists a better understanding of how Earth and other rocky planets in the solar system formed. GRAIL is scheduled to launch September 8, 2011. For more information visit: http://science.nasa.gov/missions/grail/. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann

#Delta II, ELV, science, exploration, solar system, Goddard, JPL
Rover Photos ID: undefined
2011-04-26T00:00:00Z

KSC-2011-3098

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Three solid-fueled rocket boosters are positioned for attachment to the first stage of a United Launch Alliance Delta II rocket. The boosters are being attached to the rocket at Launch Complex 17-B at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. The Delta II will carry NASA's Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory, or GRAIL, spacecraft into lunar orbit. The GRAIL mission is a part of NASA's Discovery Program. GRAIL will fly twin spacecraft in tandem orbits around the moon for several months to measure its gravity field. The mission also will answer longstanding questions about Earth's moon and provide scientists a better understanding of how Earth and other rocky planets in the solar system formed. GRAIL is scheduled to launch September 8, 2011. For more information visit: http://science.nasa.gov/missions/grail/. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann

#Delta II, ELV, science, exploration, solar system, Goddard, JPL
Rover Photos ID: undefined
2011-04-25T00:00:00Z

KSC-2011-3072

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- The first stage of a United Launch Alliance Delta II rocket at Launch Complex 17-B at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida where it is being prepared for launch. The Delta II will carry NASA's Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory, or GRAIL, spacecraft into lunar orbit. The GRAIL mission is a part of NASA's Discovery Program. GRAIL will fly twin spacecraft in tandem orbits around the moon for several months to measure its gravity field. The mission also will answer longstanding questions about Earth's moon and provide scientists a better understanding of how Earth and other rocky planets in the solar system formed. GRAIL is scheduled to launch September 8, 2011. For more information visit: http://science.nasa.gov/missions/grail/. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann

#Delta II, ELV, science, exploration, solar system, Goddard, JPL
Rover Photos ID: undefined
2011-04-25T00:00:00Z

KSC-2011-3076

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- A solid-fueled booster is lifted off a trailer at Launch Complex 17-B at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida where a United Launch Alliance Delta II is being prepared for launch. The Delta II will carry NASA's Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory, or GRAIL, spacecraft into lunar orbit. The GRAIL mission is a part of NASA's Discovery Program. GRAIL will fly twin spacecraft in tandem orbits around the moon for several months to measure its gravity field. The mission also will answer longstanding questions about Earth's moon and provide scientists a better understanding of how Earth and other rocky planets in the solar system formed. GRAIL is scheduled to launch September 8, 2011. For more information visit: http://science.nasa.gov/missions/grail/. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann

#Delta II, ELV, science, exploration, solar system, Goddard, JPL